For success on social there are really only four important principles. Luckily, they are exactly the same principles which should inform all the other ways you communicate. But whatever happens, the most crucial thing is to encourage your team tweeter or instagrammer to be themselves, says social media manager Sixty Gelu.

For success on social there are really only four important principles. Luckily, they are exactly the same principles which should inform all the other ways you communicate. But whatever happens, the most crucial thing is to encourage your team tweeter or instagrammer to be themselves, says social media manager Sixty Gelu.

1. It's like networking at an event: join conversations where you can help and show your expertise.

Granted, no one likes a know-it-all but everyone likes someone who knows what they're talking about and is keen to help.

As a small business owner or a startup founder, you probably have limited resources with which to establish your credibility. A tweet can be an easy ways to connect with customers and thoughtleaders and let them know you're part of the conversation.

Investigate which are the most important hashtags and who are the influencers in your industry. 

2. It's like targeting consumers: cultivating a small and engaged community is a lot more valuable than gathering a lot of followers.

As every good cult leader knows, followers who will follow you anywhere are more important that those who just pay you lipservice. Google got it wrong: just because everyone with a Gmail account was automatically part of Google+, it didn't mean they'd use it. It's Christmas, look to Jesus, not Larry. You need disciples that buy into your brand then act as its ambassadors.

3. It's like preparing a good presentation: talk about your business with visual stories and images.

Kim Kardashian didn't try to break the internet with sage words. Follow her rear, and make sure you always show, not tell.

4. It's like thinking about your target audience: write your social media posts in the way you'd say them. Stiff formal language will alienate followers.

Who likes picking up the telephone to find a robot who's trying to convince you you've had an accident in the last twelve months? It's no surprise that the same goes for automated tweets or Facebook statuses of the 'computer says no' variety. It's called 'social' for a reason, so make sure your team tweeter has a personality. 

 

 

 
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PR executive turned social media strategist, Sixty has built campaigns for the likes of Southern Comfort UK and Agent Provocateur. He's now at content agency TRUE_212 and tweets at @sixtylicious