On February 25 2012, London played host to the SES Conference & Expo, a global event dedicated to all aspects of the search marketing and social media industry. SES was in London as part of a worldwide tour of major cities, and featured a wide range of industry experts who spoke on topics including search engine optimisation (SEO), pay-per-click advertising (PPC) and online link building.

EVENT: SES Conference & Expo, London

LOCATION: Queen Elizabeth II conference centre

DATE: January 25, 2012

EVENT HASHTAG: #SESLondon

PHOTOS: Facebook / Flickr

SPEAKERS:

These were the speakers in events attended by inspiresme.co.uk. For the full line-up, please look at the SES website.

On February 25 2012, London played host to the SES Conference & Expo, a global event dedicated to all aspects of the search marketing and social media industry. SES was in London as part of a worldwide tour of major cities, and featured a wide range of industry experts who spoke on topics including search engine optimisation (SEO), pay-per-click advertising (PPC) and online link building.

The conference was specifically designed to help SMEs navigate what can often be a murky environment, and give them the tools and knowledge to effectively and compliantly promote their business and services across different digital channels, such as social media and email marketing.

In addition to the scheduled talks, which took place across four days, there were a number of exhibitors in the main conference area, including digital media agencies and SEO firms. Attendees were free to network with each other and discuss potential collaborations with these exhibitors during regular scheduled breaks.

In order to encourage understanding, there was also an ‘Ask the Experts’ session which allowed attendees to address the speakers directly. Each table hosted two experts on a particular topic, such as PPC, as well as four or five attendees who chatted informally about the industry and the latest trends. This really allowed freedom of discussion and allowed attendees to learn new information straight from the horse’s mouth.

Most of the speakers gave in-depth and insightful presentations that can be used by SMEs to bolster their online marketing efforts. These can be found below:


Guy Parker - How to stay out of trouble online





Avanish Kaushik - Business Optimisation In A Digital Age

"Information is powerful. But it is how we use it that will define us." -Kenyan Farmer

What metrics to measure

We have access to an enormous amount of data, but people continue to measure less useful metrics such as clicks, page views, follows and fans.

Better to measure metrics that either decrease or increase business value, for example:
  • Engagement
  • Brand damage
  • Visitor loyalty
  • 'Share' of search in comparison to competitors
  • Conversion rate
  • Unaided brand recall
  • Economic value
  • Task completion rate

You must embrace the economic value of more than just basic conversions - the top 50 ecommerce sites in the United States have just a 2 percent conversion rate.


Need to measure macro-successes (revenue) and micro-successes, which can lead to increased business value.


For example, did people who didn't buy your products deliver any economic value? e.g. ordering a catalogue, requesting a callback, signing up to your newsletter.

Social media marketing

With regard to social media marketing, we need to use data to incentivise people to do the right thing.
  • Conversation rate: Number of audience comments per social contribution
  • Amplification rate: Number of 'forwards' per social contribution e.g. number of retweets per tweet 
  • Applause rate: Number of 'positive clicks' per social contribution e.g. number of Facebook 'Likes' per page
  • Economic value: Short and long term revenue and cost savings of social contribution
Attribution models

The way we track the user journey to a goal; in multi-track journeys, for example via affiliate links or social media channels, who gets the credit?

Many firms operate on the 'last click' model, where the source that made the user convert is given full credit, but this doesn't consider how important the previous steps may have been.

A better model is the 'time decay' model, where the importance of the click increases the closer it is to the conversion. The most effective models are personalised for the website and the users.

If you do create a custom model, there are a number of variables to consider, including:
  • Time on site
  • Bounce rate
  • Media channel
  • Any previous purchases
  • Landing page
  • Display ad weight
  • Physical location
  • Season and time of day
As with all things digital, the best way to progress with your own custom model is MEASURE, VALUE and TEST variables. By increasing your UNDERSTANDING, and then TESTING again, you can BE LESS WRONG with your model.

Andrew Goodman - 11 Ways To Be Invisible To Search Engines




Karl Blanks - Landing Page Optimisation




Patrick Altoft - Key Link Building Strategies




Lisa Myers - Key Link Building Strategies




Jake Langwith - The Business Of SEO




Lisa Myers - The Business Of SEO




Thomas Bindl - PPC Tools Of The Trade




Alistair Dent - PPC Tools Of The Trade




Andy Mihalop - Key Link Building Strategies




Lee Odden - SEO Site Migration




Russell O'Sullivan - SEO Site Migration




Dax Hamman - Is Retargeting Right For You?




Guy Levine - Retargeting & Remarketing




Lisa Myers - Retargeting & Remarketing